European Court of Human Rights

Today, the European Court of Human Rights ruled that my slander conviction was unjust. I am grateful for their wisdom in acknowledging the reality of false confessions, and the need to reform police interrogation methods.

I remain forever grateful to everyone around the world who has believed in me, defended me, and spoken out on my behalf throughout the years. I couldn’t have survived this without your support.

In early November 2007, I was studying abroad in Perugia, Italy, when a local burglar named Rudy Guede broke into my home and raped and killed my friend and roommate, Meredith Kercher. I was in shock, and I volunteered to help the Perugian police in any way I could. But they weren’t interested in my help. They were determined to break me.

I was interrogated for 53 hours over five days, without a lawyer, in a language I understood maybe as well as a ten-year-old. When I told the police I had no idea who had killed Meredith, I was slapped in the back of the head and told to “Remember!”

The police found my text messages to my boss, Patrick Lumumba. He had given me the night off, and I’d written back, “Ci vediamo più tardi,” a literal translation of the English idiom “see you later.” It isn’t an idiom in Italian. The police read that sentence as a literal plan: “We will see each other later.” This small linguistic misunderstanding could have been just that. But the Perugian investigators refused to believe me when I told them I had not met Patrick that night. They painted a story for me, about how I had witnessed Patrick killing Meredith. They told me I was traumatized by the incident and had amnesia. When I told them that wasn’t true, they said I was lying, or confused. They bombarded me with questions and scenarios, over and over again, into the morning.

I trusted these people. They were adults. They were authorities. And they lied to me. They lied to me that there was physical evidence of my presence at the crime scene. They lied to me that Raffaele said I went out that night. They threatened me with thirty years in prison if I didn’t remember what they wanted me to remember. Finally, in the delirium they put me through, I didn’t know what to believe. I thought, for a brief moment, maybe they were right. Maybe I did have amnesia. I told them I could see blurred flashes of Patrick, like they said. I told them I could imagine hearing Meredith screaming, like they said. They wrote the statements; I signed them. Then they rushed out to arrest Patrick Lumumba.

Within hours, I retracted those statements. I told them I had not met Patrick that night. They didn’t care. Patrick had a rock-solid alibi. They didn’t care. They locked him up, upending his life. And they didn’t release him until two weeks later, when DNA from the crime scene came back and identified the actual killer: Rudy Guede.

The authorities went on to charge and convict Raffaele and me for Guede’s crime, and further convicted me of slandering Patrick Lumumba. It took eight years, but we were definitively acquitted of Meredith’s murder in 2015. This final verdict, however, upheld my slander conviction, even though my statements were deemed inadmissible in court because they were produced during an illegal and unrecorded interrogation. I was sentenced to three years, time served.

I know the absolute horror of sitting in prison for a crime you didn’t commit, and I spent years wracked with guilt over those statements I signed in the interrogation room. Back then, I had never heard of a “false confession.” I had no idea that one in four people exonerated on DNA evidence in the U.S. falsely confessed. Later, I learned that the coercive methods I experienced―isolation, exhaustion, deception, verbal and physical abuse―are designed to get suspects to say whatever the police want. To judge me as the author of those false statements tacitly absolves the police for their cruel and abusive behavior that produced them, ruining lives and making a mockery of justice.

The Italian Court of Cassation has already acknowledged that the Perugian investigators and prosecutors contaminated, tampered with, and destroyed material evidence. What went unacknowledged was the fact that these same investigators and prosecutors also subjected innocent people, Raffaele and myself, to psychological torture and physical abuse while under interrogation. They contaminated their own investigation by producing false statements behind closed doors. And then they blamed us.

I never should have been charged, much less convicted, of slander. And Raffaele should never have been refused his due compensation for wrongful imprisonment because he “gave contradictory statements” while under duress. Scapegoating the wrongfully convicted for the mistakes and misconduct of the police prevents us from reforming the system, leading to further miscarriages of justice.

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70 Responses to European Court of Human Rights

  1. Real Name says:

    “As somebody with an inferiority complex it’s hard for me to fathom…” (Amanda Marie Knox. February 2019, Ministry of Evil podcast, Episode 1.)

    That’s what I saw accidentally, that predates this Italy thing.

    I didn’t know her name was Amanda Marie Knox. I didn’t know that until mid 2013. But I sure as hell knew that she was different. I’ve met other teenagers who were different like that: too smart, too precocious: too transparent; too a lot of things.

    Too apple?

    Me too.

  2. Avrom Brendzel says:

    Amanda,

    Again, my congratulations on the European Court of Human Rights recognizing in its 24 January judgment that Italy violated your rights when it wrongfully convicted you of calunnia.

    While that judgment would appear sufficient to obligate Italy to grant you a revision to that conviction, turning the outcome into an acquittal or a dismissal of the case on the grounds of no evidence of a crime, the judgment did not acknowledge all of the apparent violations by Italy. Other posters here, including Gilbert Baumgartner, I believe agree that there were imperfections in the ECHR judgment.

    For example, while finding a violation of Article 3, the prohibition of inhuman or degrading treatment, on the procedural limb, because Italy repeatedly refused to carry out an investigation based on your credible claims, it did not find a violation of Article 3 on the substantive limb, because the ECHR claimed it did not have enough evidence to find this violation beyond a reasonable doubt. However, your two statements produced during the interrogation followed by the two Memoriales you wrote soon after the interrogation should be considered strong evidence, as well as the statements of high-ranking police officers De Felice, at the November 6, 2007 press conference, and Giobbi in his testimony before the Massei court.

    Another example is that the ECHR pointed out that Italy had not given you the warnings required under internationally recognized defense rights for a suspect prior to the 5:45 am statement, but failed to declare that a violation of the European Convention on Human Rights. And while the ECHR judgment “wonders” whether you were a suspect prior to the 1:45 am statement, as Gilbert points out, there is actually considerable evidence, based on the press conference of De Felice, the testimony of Giobbi, the 2008 motivation report of magistrate Mattenei, as well as the actions of police in starting to question you after they had begun interrogating Raffaele in order to force him to break your alibi (although that alibi was simply the truthful statement that you had been at his apartment at the relevant time). While some of this may have seemed to the ECHR related to the police suspicions on the murder/rape case, at the beginning of the case, those suspicions and the police and prosecution actions that brought about the alleged calunnia are conjoined and inseparable.

    One question some of us have is what happens next.

    As you know, either you or Italy may appeal the ECHR judgment prior to it becoming final on April 24, 2019. An appeal of a Chamber (7 judge panel) judgment is a request for a referral for the case to be reviewed by the Grand Chamber (17 judge panel). The imperfections of the judgment give you grounds to appeal. A request for referral is reviewed by a 5 judge panel of the ECHR, and such appeals are granted in “exceptional” cases, that is, relatively rarely unless the human rights issues are strong.

    However, even if you were granted a referral to the Grand Chamber and in their judgment they corrected some of the imperfections in the Chamber judgment, the practical difference in the outcome, such as revision of the conviction, would likely be small, although there would be an increase in justice and the protection of the defense rights of others who may face the misconduct of police and prosecutor. On the other hand, there would be an additional delay, perhaps two years or possibly more, before the Grand Chamber would be able to publish a final judgment if a referral was granted, and it might not change the Chamber judgment.

    Therefore, you and your legal team will no doubt carefully consider whether or not an appeal of the ECHR Chamber judgment is the best course.
    After the judgment becomes final (as early as April 24, 2019, if there is no appeal by you or Italy), Italy will be obligated to file an Action Plan summarizing steps it intends to carry out in order to follow the final judgment of the ECHR. The Action Plan is supposed to indicate when the respondent state will pay the “just satisfaction”, explain how the applicant will be restored to her condition before the violations (the “individual measures”), and explain how the state will prevent such violations in the future (the “general measures”). The Action Plan is sent to the Council of Europe’s Committee of Ministers (CoM), which supervises respondent states in their obligations to follow the final judgments of the ECHR. The Deputy Ministers and staff of the CoM, in the Department for the Execution of Judgments of the ECHR, carry out elements of the supervision on a weekly basis, while the Committee of Ministers itself meets quarterly to carry out supervision. The applicant is notified of the Action Plan and may comment on it or complain of any deficiencies to the CoM.

    In order to dismiss or acquit the calunnia conviction, Italy may legally require a revision hearing. According to Italian law embodied in a decision of the Italian Constitution Court, the request for revision may be heard after a final judgment of the ECHR that requires a reopening of proceedings. Violations of the right to a fair trial that have “irretrievably prejudiced the fairness of the trial as a whole” and “compromised the fairness of the proceedings as a whole”, as declared in the ECHR’s judgment, would suggest that there should be a reopening of proceedings to the extent that the alleged evidence of calunnia, obtained by official misconduct called out by those violations, should be found by an Italian judge to be entirely inadmissible, and the charges dismissed or an acquittal granted. Under Italian law, either a prosecutor or a convicted person or both can request revision. Because the Marasca motivation report specifically claimed that revision was not possible in your case because of the weight of the evidence, a claim contradicted by the ECHR judgment, it would be desirable for the Italian authorities, that is, a prosecutor, to initiate the request for revision to demonstrate the Italian authorities now recognize that there is no admissible evidence of calunnia, since your statements were derived in violation of your rights.

  3. Gilbert Baumgartner says:

    “The violations…had repercussions for other rights…and had undermined the overall fairness of the proceedings.” YES!
    It’s just a pity that the ECHR didn’t address the disclosures of the opponents or witnesses which corroborate your trueness, for example:

    “La mossa” (Giobbi, May 29, 2009) Suspected at the latest since the “hip” the night was planned in advance according to clues of journalists and set up for you with
    “certezza matematica” (Giobbi) to achieve a result by all available means
    “she buckled and told what we knew were correct” (De Felice, November 6, 2007, press conference: see also ECHR Ribemont v. France, art. 6(2) 15175/89) within limited time
    “…before your mother arrives…” (Matteini, May 15, 2008)!

    “Cabina di regia” (Giobbi) The implausible absence of recordings solely for this most important night is not explained, excused by differing and consequently ridiculous pretexts, despite the fully working equipment.

    “La sentivo urlare” (Giobbi) He heard your “screams” although he was outside, but their reasoning as a “relief of a confession” is fundamentally wrong, therefore any screams are outrageous, disturbingly unjustified and the most damning proof of degrading behaviour.

    The sheer existence of a nonsensical accusation itself as a sudden “spontaneous intuition”, even “voluntarily” placing yourself there (?!), especially in the light of immediate retraction, is a clear hint of a lack of free will and of a scandalous interrogation.

    I also miss the considerations of contributions of witnesses, primarily what Raffaele both observed about you and endured himself, definitely not limited what’s written in “Honor Bound”, and even Patrick Lumumba’s first account of his treatment, reported in an interview with Antonia Hoyle (dailymail, November 25, 2007).

    “Osmotically” put together and added to your description these indications should have amounted to enough circumstantial evidence to reach the threshold of art. 3 according to the ECHR’s own case law, enlisted in the case Bouyid v. Belgium 23380/09, Grand Chamber Judgement 28.09.2015.

    Furthermore is Italy obliged to make up for the missing investigation complying with art. 46 or is it done with the little fine and due to the “acquittal”?

    I hope Raffaele’s submission will be heard in Strasbourg too.

  4. Beth green says:

    I am so sorry for the pain and suffering you endured due to the in justice. Our daughter studied abroad and all I could think of was the fact that this could have been her. Our thoughts and prayers are with you. I hope your book is a huge success.

  5. Tom Zupancic says:

    Amanda,
    Trust, hope
    Shock
    Truth?
    Ignorance, mistakes, responsibility…
    Reality.
    Justice? Let us hope that is true.

  6. fam man says:

    An important victory, but history is already repeating itself. Ms. Knox is not the first person to be wrongfully arrested and convicted in Italy, and she’s not the last. An American teacher in Palermo is currently the victim of a witch hunt over non-existent “child porn,” as well as charges of “sexual abuse” based on false testimony obtained through coercive, repeated, marathon questioning of child witnesses who were repeatedly threatened with the possible arrest of their parents as well as imminent institutionalization of the child and her siblings. There should be a travel advisory to warn all American citizens that they may become victims of politically motivated criminal prosecution in Italy. Italian law guarantees defendants all kinds of rights, but in reality those rights are routinely ignored by some Italian prosecutors and judges. If I understand the news correctly, Amanda was awarded less than 20,000 Euros of compensation despite nearly five years of wrongful imprisonment? That won’t even cover her legal fees and expenses. Tourism is one of Italy’s major industries, and Americans are one of Italy’s biggest customers. We need to force rogue Italian prosecutors to respect Italian and international law by boycotting Italy and its products until real justice is achieved. (Anybody interested in action may contact the U.S. Consulate in Palermo.)

  7. Michael Lindner says:

    I’m happy for you. The justice system is necessary but it always needs reform. Your case hopefully will make a difference!

  8. fam man says:

    An important victory, but history repeats itself. Ms. Knox is not the first person to be wrongfully arrested and convicted in Italy, and she’s not the last. An American teacher in Palermo is currently the victim of a witch hunt over non-existent “child porn,” as well as charges of “sexual abuse” based on false testimony obtained through coercive, repeated, marathon questioning of child witnesses who were repeatedly threatened with the possible arrest of their parents as well as imminent institutionalization of the child and her siblings. There should be a travel advisory to warn all American citizens that they may become victims of politically motivated criminal prosecution in Italy. Italian law guarantees defendants all kinds of rights, but in reality those rights are routinely ignored by some Italian prosecutors and judges. If I understand the news correctly, Amanda was awarded less than 20,000 Euros of compensation despite nearly five years of wrongful imprisonment? That won’t even cover her fees and expenses. Tourism is one of Italy’s major industries, and Americans are one of Italy’s biggest customers. We need to force rogue Italian prosecutors and judges to respect Italian and international law by boycotting Italy and its products until real justice is achieved. (Anybody interested in action may contact the U.S. Consulate in Palermo.)

  9. Gina Vasak says:

    So happy for you, Amanda! The amount is not much but they have recognized how wrong the ‘Italian Justice’ has been, and that is what really counts! We always believed in you and wish you a wonderful, happy life! We are proud of you! Congratulations!

  10. Brian says:

    Thank goodness and congratulations.

    Hopefully, this will put the hater trolls accusations to rest.

  11. Rick says:

    My condolences to you for all the suffering you’ve endured during this ordeal. The only thing worse than the crime itself is to falsely accuse and convict innocent people of the crime.

    -Rick in Burien

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkwJ-g0iJ6w

  12. Mark says:

    You’re so freaking gorgeous.

  13. Alessandra says:

    Dear Amanda, is there any Italian of French version – also non official – of the Court’s judgment? Thanks a lot

  14. Gilbert Baumgartner says:

    There are rumours that you waive your right for a revision trial. If correct I hope you consider this decision, albeit it shouldn’t concern me. But if it isn’t for you personally that a criminal record doesn’t mind you could regard such an effort as part of your “other job” as an advocate to gain further awareness against misconduct with your exemplary affair also in Europe and additionally to help Raffaele’s cause too.
    Reading so far the ECHR decision they seemed to be short of a full art. 3 acknowledgement, therefore I am wondering which evidence they still needed, even when in his court testimony Giobbi admitted to have heard your screams through closed doors?
    Btw could it be time for a release of WTBH in Italian language? And does this decision bring relief and encouragement to see Scarabatolli?
    Liebe Grüße an Oma!

  15. Francesco Luna says:

    Un abbraccio, Amanda. Speravo in qualcosa di più, ma è un buon risultato.

  16. Albert R. Calleros says:

    Amanda:
    ¡FELICIDADES POR TU EXITOSA DEMANDA JUDICIAL ANTE LA CORTE EUROPEA de DERECHOS HUMANOS! Siempre he estado enteramente convencido de tu inocencia completa. Te deseo lo mejor en todos tus esfuerzos futuros. Siempre serás otra Juana de Arco en mi libro. En las palabras del Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. : ‘¡LIBRE POR FIN! ¡LIBRE POR FIN! ¡GRACIAS A DIOS TODOPODEROSO, SOY LIBRE POR FIN!’
    (CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR SUCCESSFUL PETITION BEFORE THE EUROPEAN COURT of HUMAN RIGHTS! I have always been entirely convinced of your complete innocence. I wish you the best in all your future endeavors. You will always be another Joan of Arc in my book. In the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.: ‘FREE AT LAST! FREE AT LAST! THANK GOD ALMIGHTY, I AM FREE AT LAST!’)

    Alberto (R. Calleros)
    Anaheim, CA, USA

  17. Katy says:

    Congratulations, Amanda. It’s about time.

  18. Maria Angela Oana says:

    Dear Amanda, Europe’s top human rights court ruled Thursday that your rights were violated in the hours after you were arrested in the Italian city of Perugia in 2007. I am very happy for you and I am happy to see that justice prevails. Congratulations! I always knew that you were not treated right by the Italian authorities and I am very sorry for your yearlong suffering. I also studied Italian at the university and spent a semester in Italy as an Erasmus student back in 2000 and I felt very sorry reading about your dream of studying abroad becoming a nightmare. Hopefully your most recent victory helps you in your healing process as it helps the world becoming better place.

  19. Maria says:

    Dear Amanda, Europe’s top human rights court ruled Thursday that your rights were violated in the hours after you were arrested in the Italian city of Perugia in 2007. I am very happy for you and I am happy to see that justice prevails. Congratulations! I always knew that you were not treated right by the Italian authorities and I am very sorry for your yearlong suffering. I also studied Italian at the university and spent a semester in Italy as an Erasmus student back in 2000 and I felt very sorry reading about your dream of studying abroad becoming a nightmare. Hopefully your most recent victory helps you in your healing process as it helps the world becoming better place.

  20. serf says:

    Everyone knew the African migrant did it since day one but that predictable storyline wasn’t a career driving international spectacle like blame American girl. Absolute travesty.

  21. Diana W. says:

    It’s a pittance of what they should have given you!! And while I’m not a terribly religious person I prayed daily for your release and I remember exactly where I was and how emotional I was when I learned of your release! You deserve so much more compensation, but it warms my heart to know you are getting on with your life! Sending love!!!!

  22. Tom Mininger says:

    Italian judges knew your interrogation was illegal every step of the way and knew they were violating the European treaty that Italy signed up to.

    The International Association of Chiefs of Police and The Innocence Project have teamed up to expose and reduce the procedures that cause wrongful convictions like yours over and over again for the same reasons. For anyone with 5 minutes to spare, here is their concise video on false confessions:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=6jd5AFBwtcw

    • Alessandra says:

      Thanks for posting the video. Very useful indeed

    • jerry pdx says:

      I wouldn’t use the words “false confessions” in regard to Amanda. I have read her police statement thoroughly and it is not a “confession”, she made a statement putting herself close enough to the scene in order to be a witness to the crime, she did not implicate herself in commission of the crime itself. I know she talks about “false confessions” herself but I think it’s a mistake, it creates a false impression to the public that she confessed to the murder itself, when in truth, she did not. The only one who confessed to anything was the real killer: Rudy Guede, who plead guilty and didn’t even testify in his own defense, the evidence was too overwhelmingly against him.

  23. justme says:

    You are a good and decent person and any acknowledgment of that is a good thing. Raff, too. And your families. Those of us who support you all are many in number because we see the good in you. (I just wish the ECHR had sent a bigger message.)

  24. Mumukshu says:

    I still shudder recalling what you must have been through emotionally in Italy. Although this is sweet, you need to explore if you can sue Perugian authorities for financial damages for the torment & time spent behind bars. Best wishes, always

  25. Paul Gagne says:

    Wow, what a fantastic response Amanda!

  26. kcmookie says:

    Congratulations Amanda! I accidentally became very versed in your case years ago. I remember reading the original (translated) court transcripts in an effort to form an opinion. I was looking for that one piece of evidence that made you culpable, as that was the direction I was leaning. I came away realizing you were innocent and just how corrupt the Italian justice system is. I remember reading the report, and was certain I would find my AHA! moment when they explained how the knife supposedly got to the scene and then back to Raffaele’s place. The report stated you had been carrying a big purse. What, no blood transfer, nothing? Just one last piece of conjecture with no supporting evidence? 300+ pages in, and I realized you were innocent. I have been a supporter ever since. Best of luck to you, and may you enjoy some peace & quiet in your life going forward. Publicity and the media can be a burden, even when the news is positive. Please know that you have many supporters that believe in Truth & Justice. Take care.

  27. Frank says:

    Well, it is a shame how much money you and your family lost during all these juridical processes. You will never get properly compensated for that. But it is an important symbolic victory and you can be proud to have achieved it.

    P. S.: I know that these non-existing “literal translations” can be really tricky – I am a native German language speaker and my boss is from GB… and I am quite often looking up English phrases with Google, in order to check how many hits I get on them. 😉

  28. Christine Scantlebury says:

    I feel so sorry for you having to go through all of that horror, I just hope you are living a peaceful life now and have managed to move on somehow

  29. Christine says:

    I feel so sorry for you having to go through all of that horror, I just hope you are living a peaceful life now and have managed to move on somehow

  30. Clara Londono says:

    No one can give you what they took from you. However, this new development clears you and Raffaele. Happy for you and your family.

  31. Tom Graham says:

    Amanda, I am looking at the judgement that states:

    Sixthly, it was not apparent from the file, and in particular from the record of Ms Knox’s interview at 5.45 a.m., that she had been notified of her procedural rights. Consequently, the Court held that the Italian Government had not succeeded in showing that the
    restriction of Ms Knox’s access to a lawyer, at the police interview of 6 November 2007 at 5.45 a.m., had not irreparably undermined the fairness of the proceedings as a whole. Article 6 §§ 1 and 3 (c) of the Convention had thus been breached.

    As far as I’m concerned this look pretty emphatic. What possibility is there of taking this further legally, with the aim of securing a more just compensation?

  32. Why has your Twitter been suspended?

  33. Are you kidding me? It’s great that they awarded the costs -and they’ve “cleared” Amanda’s name -what about damages? what about suit for wrongful imprisonment. As I remember the case there were clear indications that Amanda’s arrest and prosecution were the result of one particularly ambitious and unscrupulous individual using the case for his political advancement? It was not merely a mistake -or the result of vociferous investigation -it was a cynical attempt to pervert the course of justice for personal political (and no-doubt financial) gain. Everything about the case stunk! If you had told me that Amanda Knox (and her then boyfriend) had successfully sued the Italian government for wrongful imprisonment -THAT would have been a reasonable/acceptable outcome. It would also be the wake-up call that particular court at the very least, NEEDS. I say it’s time to “K” some “A” and you’d be doing hundreds (perhaps many more) of people a favor. Talk about “pre-judice” -I think they were convicted before they ever set foot in the court room.

  34. Tom Adams says:

    you have a typo on your follow button!

  35. Tom Adams says:

    I think all those police owe you all of their pensions, property and savings!

  36. Stephanie White says:

    I cannot conceive of the horror you went through. How they even turned even an innocent moment on video of Raphaelle holding & comforting you into something sinister, always bothered me. I am very glad to hear you’re being Fully exonerated. Not just for the atrocious, illegal interrogation they subjected you to. But for the YEARS of slanderous, ridiculous leaks and descriptions of your demeanor during the interrogation. I devoutly pray that everyone, from the detectives who looked at a crime scene and saw multiple killers. Instead of the ONE murderer who left his handprint(!) for God sake, along with other physical evidence pointing ONLY to him. To the prosecutors and judges who went along with this charade, lose their jobs amidst the same sordid lies and innuendos that you had to endure for years! I’m sorry, maybe they really believed what they were fed by the inept detectives. And deserve a modicum of sympathy. NOT! They knew you were innocent, Damnit! And there is No excuse for what you were put through.

    I hope that you somehow can forgive those people who made your life miserable. If only to enable yourself to move on and perhaps use your experience, to help others put in the same situation. By lazy, publicity seeking and inept detectives who are only seeking a name for themselves. And I do believe those kind of people in law enforcement are few. At least I hope this is true.

    What about the media who were responsible for the worst smear campaign of an individual I’ve seen, since the Patty Hearsts story? They were not honest, hardworking journalists, looking for truth and justice. They were disgusting vultures. Who seemed to be in some sick competition to see who could write the most outlandish, indecent and ridiculous bunch of nonsense the worlds heard of. All I have to say about them is, they will have to live with themselves and what they have done. I hope they enjoy eating their words. But like all rag sheets, they’ll probably turn on the ones who spoon fed them all the “confidential information” with which they filled their pages. Suddenly the detectives, judges, so-called insiders and prosecutors will take the place of Amanda Knox. If just one of those misogynistic, assholes recognizes the torture he helped put you through. And feels guilt or remorse, I will be grateful. But I also am realistic. They’ll all probably throw temper tantrums and scream about how unfair it all is. And that they were just doing their jobs. An excuse that died along with the guards at Auschwitz, etc. Just doing your job should never include torturing, demeaning, abusing and/or causing another individual, emotional or physical pain.

    Peace to you and your family.

  37. Terry Dale says:

    What has truly amazed me about you is that you seem remarkably well adjusted as a human being given all that you have been through, the lies told about you, and the sufferings you endured. If it were me, I would continue to have significant anger and fear that would come out in nightmares every few days in which I would be screaming non-stop at someone (the anger) or me being chased by someone (the fear). I admire your strength of character, and also admire the wonderful things that you have accomplished here in the US in the last few years. You have settled into what seems a wonderful life with a wonderful guy. I can’t think of anyone offhand that I admire more than you.

  38. Eva Lewinter says:

    “never give up, never surrender”, Captain James T. Kirk – Star Trek

    • Terry Dale says:

      Actually, the never give up quote comes from Galaxy Quest, the parody movie of Star Trek, and is said by Peter Quincy Taggart (played by Tim Allen) . But the quote certainly fits.

  39. Jason George says:

    This is Total BS. This requires restitution for both loss of time and reputation. 18k or 20k Euros just isn’t going to cut it. At least a 7-8 figure settlement is in order.

  40. jerry pdx says:

    The ECHR made a rational decision and that is good. Unfortunately, scanning through the many hate sites that are still actively persecuting you, this has made little impression. The haters are slamming the ECHR the way they slammed the Italian Supreme Court when it affirmed that you could not possibly have been involved in the murder. These people are seriously deranged, so many years later they continue to obsess about you in a way that is both frightening and disturbing. Please be careful, some of them have made threats against you.

  41. andrea says:

    i’m sorry this happened2u my heart2u xoxo 🙂 🙂

  42. Rob Hughes says:

    It’s very good news indeed. I have to say too that it’s a predictable outcome, given the evidence and in particular the text of the Boninsegna motivation report. Once the ECtHR enquired about that case, it was clear that its judgment was going to be favourable to Amanda Knox.

    I hope this will now silence yet more of the doubters of Ms Knox’s innocence. It should, but sadly not all of them will ever be silent. I hope too that the callunia conviction will now be re-opened in Italy. The constitutional court has previously decreed that no conviction can survive a finding of an Article 6 (unfair trial) breach of the convention.

    I further hope that Patrick Lumumba will come to realise that Ms Knox is not a culprit and not responsible for his appalling treatment at the hands of the Italian police. But perhaps it is too much to hope that the Kercher family will finally be able to accept the truth that Rudy Guede alone was responsible for Meredith’s murder.

    If the world were a just place, Mr Mignini and Ms Stefanoni would have faced criminal charges in Italy alongside several police officers. It is not just, at least not all the time.

    But this judgment is just and right and a thing to be treasured.

    Congratulations Amanda and good luck to you. You deserve much.

  43. Gina Vasak says:

    Fantastic! So happy for you, Amanda!

  44. John says:

    A nightmarish struggle for you and your family is finally drawing to a close. Congratulations and best wishes for the future.

  45. Anne Bowden says:

    I’m glad to hear of this (delayed as it is) justice for you. I have followed your story through the years and feel so badly for you to have had to endure this nightmare. Hope the best for you .

  46. Merciful Lee Dickens says:

    I was very glad to read this news today, Amanda.
    Twenty grand is just a pittance in light of what you went through, but at least it’s something.
    I’m happy for you.

  47. Klaus, Germany, Stuttgart area says:

    Congratulations Amanda, excellent statement, perfectly timed !
    Thanks for the link to the opinion of the court. I assume that the non-francophonic will have the opportunity to read a translation some time later and the French native speakers of your supporters will surely enjoy to be able to read court documents in their mother tongue ( though they will never enjoy the unprecedented level of convolution of some Italian court documents). It is good to read that you prevailed on the juridical issues. And that is the principal thing because injustice in that area I reckon is like constant visceral pain when confronted with the issue. This is especially true if someone becomes a public person without having asked for, and no way to ever easily go back. (Well, I reckon there are some remote islands with just igloos, seals and polar bears, so not really your thing) On the flip side, over time, I think you have truly mastered that situation, making the best out of it, while simultaneously reaching into areas that relate to what you have experienced and taking that as starting point for your interviews, reports or speeches, which I think is a good approach.
    But coming back to the court reasoning.
    I do see that the granted indemnity and compensation claims by far didn’t reach the aspired amount. And I am sorry to hear that. I think this is one of the big differences in the jurisdictions between Europe and the United States. (Take for example Ryan Ferguson as contrast). On the other hand concerning the mere compensation for time wrongly spent in prison (which is not addressed here) to my knowledge there are some federal states in the US that grant only a minimal day rate, whereas others have more appropriate plans.
    If legal remedy is maxed out one needs to find a good way or methods to cope with.
    If an appeal is possible, one needs to assess the importance a possible monetary gain has for the individual versus the efforts one needs to invest. That means financially and the “emotional cost” one has to invest
    for oneself and for the persons immediately affected in order to reach that goal.
    This is a very personal decision and the threshold on this differs from person to person.
    I think the higher the perception of any injustice to be rectified in ones personal life is the higher is the inclination to invest also this “emotional cost” . In that case in my opinion a good communication to those affected (and being on the same side) is essential.
    But enough of heavy thoughts for now !
    Celebrate this important way point with your loved ones.
    Wish you two, you and your “boo”, a long time together, too.

    • Stephane G says:

      Hello Klaus. I confess I did enjoy this French version after reading so many (long) documents in English or after asking my assistant to translate others from Italian over the past years. I’m afraid I would not be able to offer a translation of the whole text in broken English in less than 47 months or so though, but I’m sure a proper one will come much sooner. After a quick read, I haven’t noticed any significant information that could differ from what I’ve read in English or shed a light on an important issue, beyond “technical” points, so far. Of course, if I can be helpful to Amanda or anybody on a very specific question and a brief excerpt, I will try to do my best.

  48. Stephane G says:

    Finally. That story is over, or at least its legal developments. Congratulations for this outcome Amanda. I’m sincerely happy for you and your family and hope Italian authorities will now mend the damage they have done.

  49. Clive Wismayer says:

    Congratulations Amanda. Justice has finally been done on this cynical and abusive charge.

  50. Amanda, you were the victim of a horrible crime by Perugia authorities, as well as all the misinformed hate from Meredith’s family. Write a book, make a movie, get some mileage out of this horrid experience – and use it as a teaching point to help other innocent victims like yourself. Work with the Innocence Project (good energy overcomes bad energy). I don’t know how you found the strength, but you’ve made it. Congrats!

  51. Karen Pruett says:

    Very, very happy that the truth won out. Congratulations! Many hugs to Carlo for his dedication and hard work on your behalf. He is my hero.

  52. Doug Matthews says:

    At long last, the injustice against you has been fully acknowledged. I have always felt that, eventually, the truth will win. This is excellent news!

  53. Teresa Britt says:

    I admire your strength and always believed in your innocence. Sadly, this same thing happens every day in America. Italy is not the only country with forced confessions. We need to speak up.

  54. Nigel Scott says:

    It has taken a long time. Justice delayed is justice denied, but better than no justice at all.

  55. Mousel says:

    Now justice has spoken i am happy for you

  56. MARLO says:

    I am thrilled to hear that they have completely cleared your name and the truth is really out there.
    I am so glad that you had found true happiness. And have found true love with your fiancé. May you continue to have the happiest of years ahead!

  57. Michael Castro says:

    I am so glad Amanda that the truth has finally come out. I feel sorry for what you had to go through due to the incompetence of the Perugian police.

  58. Paul Bianchi says:

    I can’t believe what you went thru? I followed the whole trial. I never believed you did it. I’m glad you are back home and getting to live life!

  59. Gilbert Baumgartner says:

    Congrats! I hope you demand a retrial!

  60. Avrom Brendzel says:

    Congratulations, Amanda. The ECHR has delivered a judgment clearing you. Finally!

  61. Sarah Hager says:

    Full exoneration at long last. I was so happy to read this. Thank you for standing up for yourself and the rights of others who have been falsely accused, and never giving up. All my best wishes for your life going forward.

  62. Torsten Frahm says:

    Congrats. You deserve having your name fully cleared.

  63. Stu Lyster says:

    The truth is finally out. Thank you ECHR.

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