Memoir

Paperback

Waiting tWaiting to Be Heard new covero Be Heard, including a new afterword, came out in paperback on June 9th, 2015.

Just when Amanda thought her legal nightmare had ended, it began all over again. In March 2013, Italy’s highest court annulled the 2011 acquittal and sent the case to the lower courts for further proceedings. Even though no new evidence was introduced against her, Amanda was found guilty and sentenced to 28 years and 6 months in prison in January 2014.  This decision was overturned just over a year later by the Italian Supreme Court, which exonerated her of the murder charge.

 

 


Description

In November 20WaitingToBeHeard Final.REV07, Amanda Knox was twenty years old and had been studying abroad in Perugia, Italy, for only a few weeks when her friend and roommate, a young English student named Meredith Kercher, was brutally murdered. The investigation made headlines around the world, and Amanda’s arrest placed her at the center of a media firestorm. Young, naïve, grieving at the horrifying death of her friend, and with a little more than basic knowledge of the Italian language, she was subjected to harsh interrogations during which she struggled to understand the police and to make her own words understood. The subsequent trial exposed Amanda to international scrutiny and speculation, and she became a tabloid staple. In 2009, after an extremely controversial trial, she was wrongly convicted of murder. But in October 2011, after Amanda had spent four years in an Italian prison, and following a lengthy appeals process, the conviction was overturned. Amanda immediately flew home to the United States.

Now, in Waiting to Be Heard, Amanda Knox shares for the very first time the truth about her terrifying ordeal. Drawing from journals she kept and letters she wrote during her incarceration, Amanda gives an unflinching and deeply personal account of her harrowing experience, from the devastation of her friend’s murder to the series of mistakes and misunderstandings that led to her arrest. She speaks intimately about what it was like, at the age of twenty, to find herself imprisoned in a foreign country for a crime she did not commit and demonized byt the international media, and about the impact on her family and loved ones as they traveled back anf forth to be at her side so that she would not be alone. She describes the relationships that bloomed with thse who believed in her innocence and how the strength of her family helped her survive the most challenging time of her young life. With grace and gratitude, Amanda describes the aftermath of the trial and her return home to the States, where she is able once again to look forward to the future.

A young woman’s soul-bearing account of a nightmare turned real, of unimaginable horror and the miscarriage of justice that ensued, and, ultimately, of fortitude in the face of overwhelming adversity, Waiting to Be Heard is a memoir unlike any you have ever read.


Reviews

The New York Times – Michiko Kakutani

…[Ms. Knox] spent a lot of time in prison writing journals, poems, stories, letters, even lists of what she would do with her life (i.e., things she would do if she got out immediately, or things she would do if she were 46 when she were released). All that practice and all that introspection have given her an ability to convey her emotions with considerable visceral power–the shock of feeling the supremely ordinary morph into the utterly surreal, the vulnerability of being on trial in a foreign country in a language she had not completely mastered, the isolation of being in prison and at the center of a swirling media storm.

The Guardian – Tom Kington

The student from Seattle has had time to buff up her prose and the result is an intriguing and often compelling account of the trauma of spending the best years of one’s life in an Italian provincial jail, at the whim of what she claims are bumbling, spiteful investigators.

Facebook – Ryan Ferguson

Rhen Kohan made the wise comment that everyone interested in studying abroad should read the Knox book. It is my sincere belief that everyone over the age of 16 should read this book regardless of where they’re at or where they’re going in life. As my case proves, this can happen to anyone, anywhere and at any time.

Comments are closed.